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CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 6:30pm EST
internet smells and the history of it rather than one place or another. it is not a book about energy -- technology. -- policy. there was a moment with the sopa debate where i was confused about while -- why they were not up in arms about it. it is so crazy we could not do it. if it would happen, we could not execute it. it seems to me that airline pilots are suddenly asked why the plane is upside down. i do have a bit of stockholm syndrome with the captors. i see the internet through their eyes. i have not yet emerged myself in the opposite view in the policy discussion. >> in the construct of the internet, we are hearing a lot about the cloud. how does that fit in? >> the cloud is all of it. the cloud is a marketing term for the way in which the internet as a whole can offer business services. with that means more specifically perhaps is a large datacenter and data warehouse. perhaps not in ashford, virginia, but the next town over. they have to tether in and connect directly as possible to the distribution depot, you might say, of ashford, virginia . ashford is the place where band
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 8:00pm EST
today. welcome to clement won, a conversation about climate energy. burning fossil fuels release [indiscernible] they accepted the the fundamentals of climates science. today, things are different. skeptics are winning the comic communication battle even as temperatures rise and the intensity increases worldwide. over the next hour, we will talk about high school physics and chemistry and how science has committed in the public realm. we are joined by three distinguished scientists. michael mann is the author of "hockey and the current war." and a student from stanford university. >> i should mention that bill is here on very short notice. thank you for stepping in on such short notice you published the seminal work study on the hockey stick. tell us what the hockey stick is. >> it is not a sport. it is a curve that my co- authors and i published a few years ago. we had eight century of widespread thermometers around the world. we had to turn to what we call proxy data. it is to piece together how the clement buried in the more distant past. while it was relatively warm about a t
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 7:00am EST
higher mark, up chiselling on the mileage stickers on cars. it improves our energy efficiency. that's a good thing. that is spurring growth. but the kind of reforms we have on wall street have not solved the problem. look at what happened last week's at usb, not only wild and irresponsible behavior, but then we have attorney general holder determining that he general holderubs the fullest -- attorney general holders a betty cannot prosecute ubs because he is afraid ubs is too big to shut down and would destroy financial markets. i thought dodd-frank was supposed to fix that. what was so disconcerting was the democrats did not join senator grassley in their u.n outcry about that protect the integrity of financial markets. it is something that should be bipartisan. but it is not, apparently. that is an example of regulation cannot afford. not all it is it is expensive, it's keeping people from getting loans, and it is impeding economic growth, which we need to pay for that column i talked about. host: on twitter -- guest: it is not. it is something people gravitate to because they use a r
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 7:00am EST
big portion of the problem. thank you. host: what energy end of the year energy issues are we looking at here and which ones are likely to get punted down the road? guest: that's a good question. i'm not sure what energy issues -- i'm not aware of any -- host: tax issues? guest: tax issues for the fiscal cliff. but going down the road you definitely have some issues. there's the need for a new highway bill, they've had trouble tasking the highway legislation because no one is willing to increase the gas tax. and our gas taxes are the main ways we pay for new roads and bridges and that kind of thing. so i think that's a relatively short-term problem. and then over the long term, which i've talked about here before, is that given that we're going to need some rev now help solve our future fiscal burden, one of the most sensible places to raise revenue would be through a carbon tax or something similar because that can also help us reorient our energy priorities to cleaner, less damaging greenhouse gases type of energy. host: i want to note that you can go to the c-span fiscal cl
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 8:00pm EST
historically at these bipartisan commissions or other groups, you mentioned the energy airforce base. during the reagan administration, a great big commission that sounfound a soln for social security, these were big public fora where discussions were held with the public and now everything seems to be happening behind closed doors. why could openness happened in years past and today we can seem to get to deal? >> in large measure because the media has so changed. in those days, you did not have 24-hour coverage. what you find with 24-hour coverage if an idea services, at 10:00 a.m., it is dead by 2:00 p.m. because everybody goes to the cameras. the cameras are there. ever-present and wine to -- wanting to hype something. before you debate it is dead. you really see that around here. >> there has been a fair bit of criticism of the president for not embracing the findings of that commission. what is your take? >> i advised the president not to embrace the specifics because i feared if he did, house republicans would automatically be in opposition. if you are part of the commission yo
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 12:05am EST
country and we can prove it with real research. when states have the right to develop their own energy, like we've seen in north dakota and pennsylvania, the revenues that come into the government help to build better roads, better schools, and keep taxes lower. that's an opportunity i hope we can have in south carolina. and when states can control more of their transportation and infrastructure dollars that can be more efficient and do much better than we are or what we can do now under the federal regime, so the principles of freedom are working all over the country. we need to spotlight them, showcase them, communicate them all over the country, so that people see that these ideas work and at the same time, they're going to be able to look to washington over the next few years and see that the ideas that are in place are not working. they're dragging us down. and so when washington hits a wall, which we know they will, the friends of freedom here in south carolina and all over the country are going to be ready not with political ideas, but with american ideas. ideas that we know are
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 11:00pm EST
treaties to the energy legislation where byrd worked tirelessly on it to get it done without a filibuster. he had the sense that the senate leader should have a special relationship with the president and that is the way the system was supposed to work. of course, the most important in for the senate leader is to make the senate work. byrd knew the senate rules better than any person that ever lived. he lived in dealing with the notion of the fear of a paralyzed senate. he wanted to think that the rules worked, but he knew that in fact jim allen of alabama had cracked the code. he had figured out how to have this filibuster so the senate could be tied up in paralyzed. robert byrd like to think you have to be an expert to do this, but it turned out you do not need to be an expert at all. a couple of senators did not know the rules and they tied the senate up. byrd struggled with the notion of how to keep the unique character of the senate without having a paralyzed? in that regard, he championed rules change. he got some done in 1979. he knew that the senate rules do not work. i
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 6:00am EST
. maybe and injured vietnam vet could channel the energy of our caucus. i met with his and violence community the other night. you know what it all came back to? we understand about youth violence and the rest, but you have to get rid of these high- performance guns. magazines. whatever you call them. i called them a clip once, adn they told me i didn't know what i was talking about. they are a magazine. we are making all these cuts in samsa, where mental-health illness is addressed. they need to be addressed, in addition to the influence on gun violence. we need to address violence in our society, in the glorification of it in some places. we have to address the actual issue of how do we give a fair chance. if anyone of us and everyone of you had a chance to pull that magazine out of the hands of the shooter to protect those kids, he would do it. we have the opportunity to do it not only physically, but legislatively, to take that out of the hands. you know congressman ron barbour, who was congresswoman giffords' assistant and was wounded that day. he has had 20 years of experience
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 1:00am EST
. doubling of renewable energy. these things are some of the changes in environmental law relative to emissions -- they are all part of that effort. we have got to do more. we have to build on that. but it is certainly a commitment. one thing we recognize is that it does not have to be a competition between our economy and our health, because renewable energy and clean energy have economic benefits that are pronounced, and people understand that. so we highlighted the issues we felt needed to be highlighted for voters who are going to make the decision in the election, but the president's agenda is reflected in his work, and i expect he will continue to work hard on this issue is. >> let's take these last questions as we wrap this up. >> thanks for coming back to the university of chicago. i have a quick follow up. yourding super pac's -- just now reclaim your concerns about unlimited money in campaign financing. on the other hand, we saw earlier today had democrats were already oiling up their machines for 2014 and 2016. what are the prospects for repealing citizens united or compreh
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 9:30pm EST
gentleman. >> in april, the prime minister stated energy efficiency will be placed at the heart of government policy. on monday of this week, the government's feel advisory group warned that there could be over 9 million households in the fuel poverty. can the prime minister tell us why for next year, expenditure on heating insulation programs for low-income households will be halted? >> i know the lady takes a deep interest -- the green a deal is a bigger and better program being brought in. i would make the point that labour promised to abolish fuel party altogether in 2005, and l party came up. we have done is we have maintained the payments and increased the cold weather payments. we're making money available under the fund. the green deal -- some of the biggest schemes ever introduced in the country. >> does the prime minister agree with the shadow health secretary that any increase in the expenditure of the nhs would be, as he put it, irresponsible? >> my friend makes an important point. in a recent health debate, the health secretary asked the health secretary -- shall help
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 9:35pm EST
moving to where they can thrive. and this benefits every american. we look at energy development and we talk about that at the national level of how it can create prosperity for our country if we open it up. we don't have to guess at whether or not it works. i mean, we can look at north dakota, you can look at pennsylvania. states that have gone around the federal rules and figured out how to develop their own energy are creating jobs and tax revenue to their governments. they were able to lower their taxes, use the revenue to improve everything about their states. and here we make it political and partisan on whether or not our country can develop more and more energy. but at the state level it's just about what works. and all we have to do is look at what works. this is not rocket science. i came to washington as a novice in politics, believing in the power of ideas, seeing how ideas can revolutionize different industries, can create new products and services meeting the needs of customers everywhere. and that's what i hoped we could do here in washington. maybe naively i went to work
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 1:00am EST
prosper. it needs the energies of the creative imagination, as expressed in religion and the arts. it is crucial to the lives of all of our citizens, as it is to all human beings at all times, that they encounter a world that possesses a transcendent medium. the world in which the human experience makes sense. nothing is more dehumanizing, more certain to generate a crisis, then to experience one's life as a meaningless event in a meaningless world. we may be approaching what is unexplored and parallels social territory. -- perilous social territory. europe is experiencing the widespread waning of the religious impulse. it seems that when a majority of people internalize the big bang theory, and ask, with peggy lee, is that all there is? when people decide that the universe is the result of a cosmic sneeze with no transcendent meaning, when they conclude that life should be filled to overflowing with distractions, comforts and entertainments to as which -- assuage the boredom. they might give up the excitements of politics. we know from experience of the bloodsoaked 20th century,
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 6:00am EST
all the things the we do here, unemployment, energy problems -- when i get up in the morning, i get "the new york times," and the first place i go is the sports page. for a few minutes every morning, i dream of the athlete that i wanted to be. [laughter] and as i have dreamed over the decades, i thought, wouldn't it be great to be able to meet a babe ruth or lou gehrig? or maybe a rocky marciano? joe frazier? but today, i have been able to meet two of the people i have dreamed about going down to that 18th hole. with a good put, i can win this thing. this is a personal privilege for me to be able to meet the great jack nicklaus and to be here to help honor the great arnold palmer. we know that arnold palmer has played on the finest courses that the world has. he has designed 300 golf courses. seven of them are in nevada, operating now. he has won trophy after trophy after trophy. he has been swinging golf clubs since a little boy of four years old. he was always such a big star. i hope, arnold, you'll remember. you and winnie were traveling across the country. they stopped a long wa
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 1:00pm EST
we need to do is spend our efforts and energy in trying to achieve a plan that will carry us forward. i still am optimistic we can do that. i'm hopeful that we will do it. if we don't do it in the next several weeks before the new year, i hope it is done immediately there after. i think it would be better for the country and economy and people's confidence in the act of this country to make decisions and govern wisely if we were able to make an agreement before the end of the year. and that is still possible despite the u turn from the speaker yesterday. i hope that the discussions continue and prove conclusive. with that i want to thank you for this opportunity and i'll be happy to answer questions people might have. >> we will take questions. the questions will be first from members of the media and national press club members and then if no hands are raised after that we will go to others. >> senator i want to tie some things together in terms of your great, informative powerful knowledge based so speech and ask a question that brings us into focus given current continue verse sis
CSPAN
Dec 21, 2012 10:30pm EST
eloquence of the spoken words about the challenges that we face. hopefully we will turn that energy from occurring. i want to commend the president and vice president biden for working on this issue. there are obvious ones like getting assault weapons. and the question is, what will we do? secretary, thank you, and thank the president for supporting us. [applause] i want to recognize the council members that have joined us today. and the council member that within the last 24 hours, the chair of the education committee. both are experienced and are very committed to the district. thank you for being here. to the folks that have joined us, our deputy mayor that has a daunting responsibility of health and human services, and who has enormous experience working with children, especially early childhood. the deputy mayor for education, we appreciate you stepping up. our chair that leaves the child and family services committee. we got a glowing report just the other day with the progress we are making. it wasn't long ago that we had children in foster care in the city. the number is dow
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 1:05am EST
energy as well, in education. k-12 released 0-12. -- or at least 9-12. >> i am very interested in program transparency. what ever happens with the fiscal cliff negotiations, government agencies are going to be extremely press from a budget and standpoint. in the short term, it seems to be -- having a legacy system cannot be afforded. how do we overcome the cost pressure of making things open, making them accessible? it is not free. i am really interested in comments about the impact of the realities of cost on making things more accessible and open. >> i am fascinated by the trend we have in front of us. we have the modernization act, which should have added to that and facilitated improvements in efficiency. you have budget pressures which should dovetail nicely with modernization. yet when you look at dramatic increases in it investments over the last couple years -- and there have been, they are largely associated with legacy approach is creating a future funding stream for a sil within the bureaucracy. -- silo within the bureaucracy. this is the great paradox. if you have limi
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 3:33pm EST
much to be done on jobs, income, education, and energy. we are a week away from one of the worst tragedies in memory. so we have got work to do on gun safety. a host of other issues. these are all challenges we can meet. these are all colleges we have to meet, if we want our kids to grow up in america that is full of opportunity and possibility, as much opportunity and possibility that our parents and our grandparents left for us. but we are only going to be able to do it together. we are going to have to find some common ground. the challenge we have got right now is that the american people lot more thoughtful, and much give and sacrifice and act responsibly, than their elected representatives are. that is a problem. there is a mismatch between how everybody else is thinking about these problems, democrats and republicans up side of this town, and how folks are actingwe have to get the aligned. that. i hope every member of congress is thinking about that. nobody can get 100% of what they want. this is not simply a contest between parties in terms of who looks good and who does
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 1:00am EST
energy in getting the republican party. we've not learned how to do that yet, i don't think. i like being a democrat for that reason. >> one of the things we hear from long-term members or members who are leaving is the congeniality here has changed. what is your view? >> person-to-person, you know what our elevators are like here. the public probably doesn't but we get squished and it is fun. there's humor and there is a lot of banter and people don't dislike each other, period. but you get off that elevator and it changes. when i first got here, people were -- the thing that surprised me was how polite, how respectful everybody was to everybody no matter what party you were, no matter what the issue was. it was very respectful. so you could carry on real conversations that over the years it has gotten -- it is just not. that's been a huge disappointment. >> our research shows that you are spoken on the floor, given 400-plus speeches. >> almost 450. >> in the house of representatives, why do you use that platform and how much time do you spend on the floor? >> for those speeches, i
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 2:00pm EST
politics and legislation. it is not in our genes to put a whole bunch of energy in getting the republican party. we've not learned how to do that yet, i don't think. i like being a democrat for that reason. >> one of the things we hear from long-term members or members who are leaving is the congeniality here has changed. what is your view? >> person-to-person, you know what our elevators are like here. the public probably doesn't but we get squished and it is fun. there's humor and there is a lot of banter and people don't dislike each other, period. but you get off that elevator and it changes. when i first got here, people were -- the thing that surprised me was how polite, how respectful everybody was to everybody no matter what party you were, no matter what the issue was. it was very respectful. so you could carry on real conversations that over the years it has gotten -- it is just not. that's been a huge disappointment. >> our research shows that you are spoken on the floor, given 400-plus speeches. >> almost 450. >> in the house of representatives, why do you use that
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 10:30pm EST
managing. i was an engineer with a passion to try a lot of new stuff and i have a lot of energy. i hired people because i could not do myself what i wanted to do, and so i had employees. and i respected the work that they did because i gave them good salaries and the very best dental and health insurance, better than lockheed. and i never thought that i was there to grow a business or to make a profit. in fact, the number one thing -- and i always said that even to those who held stock in my company -- the number one thing, the biggest priority for my employees was to have fun. i enjoyed the accomplishment of breakthroughs and the fun of a first applied. and everyone who worked for me deserved to have that enjoyment. the second priority was the families of the employees have fun. that is why we provided good salaries and good health care and so on. the third priority, no cutting to make a profit. it is tough to say that to a stockholder or a board member. but every company i have ever seen go bankrupt, they started having fun -- they stop having fun before that. when people have fu
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 1:40am EST
stupid as to develop the unconventional fossil fuels because they're dirtier, you get less energy per unit carbon and you get all these other pollution, regional pollution. so we need to try to talk common sense into them and we've -- you know, we've done -- i've been arrested in the front of the white house because of the tar sands. and there are more and more people who are willing to stand up and protest against those. and i know i sound like a broken record, but just -- and i've realized that just trying to block an individual carbon source, although that's meritorious, it won't work if we don't have a price on carbon. >> yeah. and china will just -- all right. we're gonna invite your participation and, particularly, if you haven't had a chance to ask a question. and i'm gonna be assertive about -- i'm encouraging you to be brief and get to your question so we can get as many people to participate as possible. the line starts with our producer jane ann right there, and then i welcome your comments for dr. hansen. let's invite the audience participation. yes, welcome to climate one
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 12:35am EST
on the planet burning carbon for energy, we will be adding more carbon to the atmosphere. on the other hand, people who are living in a western-style exist then use a lot more energy than people in the developing world. one of the terms in the product of terms from which we deduce future carbon emissions is global population. we tend to believe the global population will stabilize with 10 billion people by the middle of the century because the developing world will take on some of the characteristics of the western world in terms of their rate of production, for example. when you look at some of those projections, built into many of them is the assumption that the global population will eventually stabilize. if it does not do that, it means that the problem is even worse. that is the key uncertainty, the wild card. >> the bottom-line is a really nice where people are in the world, but how many people want a u.s. lifestyle. >> thomas rÜgen talks about an america that has 3 billion people. >> my name is wayne rauf. it is -- wayne rth. what will it take to make the sacrifices to sa
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 6:30pm EST
design, consume vast amounts of energy in an incongruously wasteful manner, interviews and documents show. >> that is right. we also point out that different plays in this industry behave differently. there is a range. we're talking about the typical data center. doing these digital tasks, everything from banks to big department stores -- the computers in these data centers typically are actually not doing anything but trying electricity, for the most part. most of the electricity -- the vast majority -- is powering a computer that is waiting for something to do. these things, once turned on -- we as consumers insist that this infrastructure always be available, and never run out of capacity. those computers are sitting there, just waiting for us to call upon them to do something. whether it is day or night, the dead of night when no one is asking for the service, or the middle of the day when everyone is, they're always on. it is a built-in way of operating in this industry. it has developed a lot of critics. >> you also write about their energy use. worldwide, 30 billion watts of e
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 10:00am EST
lot of people of talent and energy. we need everybody to participate. if that is how we can proceed, i think we will be better off two years from now. >> i would echo that. my ultimate goal is equal opportunity for all and part of that is general -- is gender- related. i want to give out a shout out to private employers who can do better. i was very fortunate to work part time. most people did not know that. i worked four days a week. how was the first part time law partner in the state and my colleagues -- i was the first part time law partner in the state and my colleagues were great. the had to lock myself in a closet for a conference call. my kids were out playing. and the client asked for their children there? yes, my office is next to that christian school. that was true. i just was not in the office at the time. [laughter] but now we are more open about it. we all need to take responsibility. even as i am negotiating with my staff, you can get really great talent if you give them a little bit of flexibility. just let them pick up that 5:15. they are probably willing to come i
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 7:00pm EST
and small businesses. energy projects and to the united states are being held back by federal obstacles of all kinds and the keystone xl pipeline is hanging in the bomb -- balance because the president has refused to move forward on what should have been an easy decision for more energy and more jobs. republicans hope to work across the aisle to solve these and other critical challenges facing america in the new year. divided government is a good time to solve our problems and in the next few days, leaders in washington have a . -- an important responsibility to work together to do just that. unless the congress of president act immediately, every american will be forced to pay for the largest tax hike in our nation's history on january 1. at the same time, the federal government, including our armed forces, will undergo deep budgetary cuts. these are the cuts that president obama promise to run the campaign would never take effect. what we need to reduce spending, we can do it in a smarter way. economists not representing either political party have continually warned that go
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 10:00am EST
passion to try a lot of new stuff and i have a lot of energy. i hired people because i could not do myself what i wanted to do, and so i had employees. and i respected the work that they did because i gave them good salaries and the very best dental and health insurance, better than lockheed. and i never thought that i was there to grow a business or to make a profit. in fact, the number one thing -- and i always said that even to those who held stock in my company -- the number one thing, the biggest priority for my employees was to have fun. i enjoyed the accomplishment of breakthroughs and the fun of a first applied. and everyone who worked for me deserved to have that enjoyment. the second priority was the families of the employees have fun. that is why we provided good salaries and good health care and so on. the third priority, no cutting to make a profit. it is tough to say that to a stockholder or a board member. but every company i have ever seen go bankrupt, they started having fun -- they stop having fun before that. when people have fun, they will work like. that was my
CSPAN
Dec 21, 2012 8:00pm EST
, education, and energy. we are a week away from one of the worst tragedies in memory. so we have got work to do on gun safety. a host of other issues. these are all challenges we can meet. these are all colleges we have to meet, if we want our kids to grow up in america that is full of opportunity and possibility, as much opportunity and possibility that our parents and our grandparents left for us. but we are only going to be able to do it together. we are going to have to find some common ground. the challenge we have got right now is that the american people are a lot more sensible and a lot more thoughtful, and much more willing to compromise and give and sacrifice and act responsibly, than their elected representatives are. that is a problem. there is a mismatch between how everybody else is thinking about these problems, democrats and republicans up side of this town, and how folks are acting here. we have to get the aligned. and we only have 10 days to do that. i hope every member of congress is thinking about that. nobody can get 100% of what they want. this is not simply a c
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 10:00am EST
distraction of the nation's concern and energy into iraq was unpardonable. i felt what -- it was inept and corrupt and opaque. those were tough years for me. i was motivated to see barack obama, sort of a surprise, really. i could not believe we had gotten such a real person, to make it through the filter system of our politics. it meant a lot to me. i know it would have meant a huge amount to my father. i think of him often. so, again, in 2012, kim and i went on the road for obama. we did about three dozen events. it restored my faith in the country, to meet these people who had committed themselves to this reelection campaign. it was the largest grass-roots event we have ever seen in this country. the people involved were fundamentally such good people, i felt. it really meant a lot to me to be involved in an. they were smart, too. they did it really well. they were committed to this mission and they really carried it out beautifully. i should say also that although i am a relentless democrats, i do believe that a dialogue between a reasonable dialogue between republicans and d
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 9:05pm EST
doesn't happen very often. welcome to climate one, a conversation about america's energy, economy and environment. i'm greg dalton. in 1988, nasa scientist james hansen told a congressional hearing that it was 99% certain that burning fossil fuels was heating the earth's atmosphere. the next day, a new york times headline proclaimed, quote, global warming has begun, expert tells senate. a quarter century later, dr. hansen and other scientists are still striving to convince much of the united states that basic scientific observation -- seas are rising, glaciers are disappearing, floods are increasing. humans are the cause. about half of americans now accept that fact, 40% do not, according to gallup. over the next hour, we will discuss climate science communication, public policy and opinion, with james hansen and our live audience here at the commonwealth club of california in san francisco. today, dr. hansen is receiving the 2012 stephen schneider award for outstanding climate science communication bestowed by climate one. stephen schneider was a pioneering scientist at stanford who
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 8:00pm EST
words which a society needs more than sensible men and women if it is to prosper. it need the energy jiss of the creative imagination as expressed in the arts. it is crucial to the lives of all of our citizens as it is to all human beings at all times that they encounter a world that posseses a trance send nt meaning in which the human experience makes sense. nothing is more dehume nicing, more certain to generate a crisis than to experience one's life as a meaningless event in a meaningless world. we may be approaching what is for our nation unexplored and unperilous territory. europe is experiencing that and the results are not attractive. it seems that when a majority of people internalize the big bang theory and ask with peggy lee is that all there is, when many people decide the universe is the result of a cosmic sneeze with no meaning, when they conclude that therefore life should be filled, overflowing with distractions, comforts and entertainments to aswage the board m, then they may become suss september bling to the excitements of politics that promise ar sets meaning and s
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 10:00am EST
address of food security and generate sources of energy. despite the potential, they live below the poverty line. many live in fear including the m23 rebels and rebels who are on the exclusion list. tackling these forces is a necessary condition to achieve sustainable peace and addressing the evolving situation, an urgent priority has to be resolving the current crisis of the movements of m23 with an understanding that it is this has to do with governance and national integration. precursor signed a treaty with the democratic of kong grow on the 23rd of march that established them as a political party. many were integrated into the country's armed forces. the units were reviewed as both capable and highly motivated to take on fdlr. the cndp unit fall in more locally. that is where they were fundamentally focus. the governments were closely aligned from 2009 until this past april and their common efforts to eliminate the negative forces. this spring three current developments that led to m23's rebellion. they were just -- they're dissatisfied. they meet needs. the international commu
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 9:00am EST
goes down. host: this follow-up -- if you are poor, you'd have to spend a lot of energy to get enough to beat. john, connecticut. good morning. caller: good morning. i was calling to mention low- quality food and the cost of health care, but you covered well. do you think it would be more beneficial if they start doing a local farming program where they could start growing vegetables? maybe have some land with tiles and chickens, and local people could work on the farming areas and return the food to the communities as opposed to being so reliant on high-salt diets, the foods we would coin as having a long shelf life, leaving it on the shelf for six months without going bad? has the government been able to look into those programs, considering the finances involved in the program as a whole? host: thank you. a related topic -- the availability of this fresh produce is a big distraction for many. guest: there are some programs that speak directly to the point, one our farms-to-school programs, directed to help know where food is coming from and getting fresher food into the schools. in
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 11:30pm EST
dirt cheap excess of energy. but it will be costly down the road. we still have time to avert a future where we leave our children and grandchildren a degraded planet, but there's not a whole lot of time. >> basically-judges has been -- basically, our idea has been let's make our children richer and they can figure it out here [laughter] my daughters may live to the end of this century. what are they looking at? >> there is still time to prevent -- most scientists classify it as what would constitute a very dangerous impact on the plan met -- on the planet. we can prevent that. we would have to prevent sued to concentration -- would have to prevent co2 concentration. next year, if we were sitting in this room, rudi 397. -- they would be about 397. you can get to 450 pretty soon if we do not make some dramatic changes. if you do the math -- my good friend has going around the country with the do the math tour. we can still prevent dangerous impacts on our climate. but we have to bring our fossil fuel emissions to repeat within a matter of years. we have to ramp and down dramatica
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 10:00am EST
historically at these bipartisan commissions or other groups, you mentioned the energy air force base. during the reagan administration, a great big commission that found a solution for social security, these were big public fora where discussions were held with the public and now everything seems to be happening behind closed doors. why could openness happened in years past and today we can not seem to get to deal? >> in large measure because the media has so changed. in those days, you did not have 24-hour coverage. what you find with 24-hour coverage if an idea services, at -- surfaces, at 10:00 a.m., it is dead by 2:00 p.m. because everybody goes to the cameras. the cameras are there. ever-present and wanting to hype something. before you debate it is dead. you really see that around here. >> there has been a fair bit of criticism of the president for not embracing the findings of that commission. what is your take? >> i advised the president not to embrace the specifics because i feared if he did, house republicans would automatically be in opposition. if you are part of the
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 8:00pm EST
need, investing in things like education and research and development, investing in clean energy and technology, investing in infrastructure and dealing with the deficits were more -- in a more balanced way. it was about what our obligations are to each other. it was about big things. those are very, very big things. i will say that, for all of the critique about whether our campaign was about big things or not, the preoccupations of people who write about that -- and i used to do that for a living -- i don't try to separate myself -- many of them are my best friends -- there is an awful lot of horse race coverage of this presidential race. there is such a preoccupation with who will win and who will lose and so little real interest in what the implications are. >> we were talking about pulling. >> public polling is so voluminous now. any to kids with an abacus can do a poll of the corner grocery store and some national news are in position will cover it as if it is news. and maybe the billion tommy pulled him out today. -- the billy and tommy poll came out today. it can be done soun
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 6:00am EST
. that is why i look for in people. i look for that energy. >> thank you, you have a lot of energy, secretary hilda solis, we're glad you came. [applause] c-span3 c-span2 >> by the time i was 9 years old, was handing out leaflets for robert kennedy and then i broke with the democratic party. i went to work for john lindsay who is running for mayor of new york. i went down to the liberal party to work for him i was handed out leaflets on the street corner in new york. some woman thought this was cute, this little boy handing out leaflets and chest and why and i made the case for john lindsay and got an early start on my political consulting career and made the case against his opponent as well. she said that is so cute and she handed me a box of pastry, a white box with string, and it took a back to the liberal party headquarters and we opened it up and there was all these doughnuts and a wad of $10 bills. in one of my early lessons and politics, the district's lawyer grabbed the mom -- grab the money and said you can keep the donuts. [laughter] >> david axelrod to night on his life
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 10:30am EST
you. i want to switch topics. he has also been a big step in of energy policy -- champion of energy policy. discovery of natural gas in your state has changed the economy. where do you think this new discovery of this resource is going to lead us? >> i did it is incredibly positive for the united states. we of gone from 60% foreign energy dependence down to 40%. there are a lot of projections now the we could become energy independent over the next several decades. that would be an incredible boon to this country. instead of sending $400 billion or five order billion dollars abroad every year to buy scarce energy supplies for people who do not particularly like us, we could be spending that at home. think of the difference that will make to the economic strength of united states. think about what it will mean to job opportunities, the economic strength of america. natural gas is a very clean resources compared to many of the other options. our progress . on reducing dependence has also been on grenoble's. -- progress on reducing dependence has also been on renewables. all across nor
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 2:00pm EST
. host: joshua gordon, what in the year energy issues are we looking at? -- >> end of the year energy issues are we looking at? guest: i am not aware of any major ones for the fiscal cliff. going down the road, and you definitely have some issues. there is the need for a new highway bill. they have had trouble passing highly legislation because no one is willing to increase the gas tax. our gas taxes are the main way we pay for the new roads and bridges and that kind of thing. i think it is a relatively short-term problem. long term, we're going to need revenue to solve our future fiscal burden. one of the most sensible places to raise revenue would be through a carbon tax or something similar. that can also help to reorient our energy priorities to cleaner types of energy. host: i want to note that you can go to the c-span fiscal cliff website to get the latest information. you should be checking back over the next 48 hours as things develop. guest: 8 the deadline this afternoon. the senate has set a self- imposed deadline for 3:00. host: is that senator reid's plan b? guest: it is c
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 1:00am EST
other places, all that helps. that is the kind of energy that was given to me. "i'm going to take a risk. i may not be perfect at it." >> do you work all the time? >> i am a morning person. >> i could be on the west coast and i am not at 5:00 a.m. and people on the west coast would say i'm crazy. i will lose the thought so why do it. i am an early riser. that was something that was instilled in us. >> is 5:00 a.m. kind of typical? >> yes. >> how late did you work? >> i tried to get in at a decent hour. as a pastime, people do not think that we do this but i like to cook. i try to eat healthy. i will do cooking of vegetables and light entrees. something i enjoy is making home cooked pinto beans. when you brought in a household where that is pretty much all you need, but now it is like a luxury. it is what you put in, the kinds of spices. it is healthy for you. >> you ran the labor department. what is the biggest work ethic for women today? >> breaking through the glass ceiling. we have about 57% of diversity in my kitchen cabinet at the dol. that is hard work. the top person is proje
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 7:00am EST
to cornell to do sustainable energy. we are in a double down on reaganomics in despite. jimmy carter had great inflation because for five years we were a peaceful country again. then reagan put us back into the largest military buildup in peacetime. i think that's what we ought to do is realize that did not work, just like some of the new deal stuff was not working correctly. what we have to do is c- span.org [indiscernible] i want to thank mr. richard delver of the department of transportation, because unlike michael bloomberg -- host: you have gone a little bit off track, but we appreciate your comments this morning. you can see his picture on your screen. and from the new york times business section -- and from "usa today" -- that the lead this morning in "usa today." coming up, steve forbes will be here in 45 minutes to take your calls regarding issues in washington, including what we just talked about. next is lawrence yun of the national association of realtors to talk about the real estate market and how the fiscal cliff could affect it. we will be right back. >> ♪ [v
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 2:00am EST
energy and creativity of america's youth as they make positive choices in their lives and refuting the prodrug messages that overwhelm them. we continue to support that message. i will turn us back over to dr. stein. thank you very much. [applause] >> our next speaker is dr. lloyd johnson who is the distinguished senior research scientist at the university of michigan social research and the principal investigator of the monitoring the future studies since its inception in 1975, which is an amazing contribution he has provided to understand the trends in the drug use. he served as an adviser to the white house, congress, and many international bodies and has conducted research in a wide variety of issues including the use of alcohol, tobacco and various illicit drugs. [applause] >> thank you very much. good morning to all of you. i am pleased so many of you have turned out. it is a pleasure to announce results from the steady joining dr. koh and dr. volkow. despite all of the years, i actually get younger. each time we do a survey, a special arrangements. you have heard a lot of the re
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 1:00pm EST
the panama canal treaties to the energy legislation where byrd worked tirelessly on it to get it done without a filibuster. he had the sense that the senate leader should have a special relationship with the president and that is the way the system was supposed to work. of course, the most important in for the senate leader is to make the senate work. byrd knew the senate rules better than any person that ever lived. he lived in dealing with the notion of the fear of a paralyzed senate. he wanted to think that the rules worked, but he knew that in fact jim allen of alabama had cracked the code. he had figured out how to have this filibuster so the senate could be tied up in paralyzed. robert byrd like to think you have to be an expert to do this, but it turned out you do not need to be an expert at all. a couple of senators did not know the rules and they tied the senate up. byrd struggled with the notion of how to keep the unique character of the senate without having a paralyzed? in that regard, he championed rules change. he got some done in 1979. he knew that the senate rules do n
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 10:00am EST
the bad energy out? >> and projecting a good image of yourself. >> do you have any tricks about staying positive? >> i have a lot of faith. and goodness i see in people, it comes in many forms. i just came from queen's new york and visited a hurricane victims. but don't have any jobs they're helping their neighbors clean-air yard every saturday, exposing themselves to all kinds of things and doing at because they want to do something for their community. i am compelled to say my goodness, if these people are willing to risk their lives, what can i do to help them? >> thank you. you have given me a perfect segue. i would like to pull the thread of proposing a new idea and the possibility of getting up and running out the bad stuff. one of the things women tend to do is dismiss ourselves. we dispose of our ideas if of the pressures that come in power and say i'm sorry. could you talk about that were times when you faced that where you -- where does that come from? how would you instruct other women to not dismiss their ideas? be >> it depends on the circumstance. but i draw my pas
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 1:00pm EST
not address the issue of the bureaucracy. you go on line and let that the department of energy or the department of education and the number of employees they have. we do not need all that. they can cut the number of employees in half and we would have real savings. nobody will address these issues. i'll hang up. guest: when you have a budget in washington, it is hard to cut back politically. if you do, people say you are against the were the goal. this worthy goal, that worthy goal. there was a british historian in the 1950's. after world war i, britain had the largest navy in the world and they reduced the size of the navy. the laid-off sailors and dock workers. the agency running the navy was getting bigger as the navy was getting smaller. he made the discovery -- the size of a bureaucracy has nothing to do with the amount of work the bureaucracy does. it will grow unless it is reined in. the bureaucracy was getting bigger. if you get that kind of bloat, get in trouble and you change or go out of business. ronald reagan said the closest thing to immortality is a government agency.
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